Effects of dating on academic performance

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Anything that takes up your time, attention and energy can affect how well you do in school. The impact of your dating life on academic performance will depend on how well you are able to find a balance between your social life and your studies. In moderation, dating can help your academic life. As with any other aspect of your social life, the more comfortable you feel in your dating relationship, the better you are likely to perform in school.

Dating & Academic Performance | Synonym

If you experience the death of a loved one, have a fight with your best friend or a date that is too demanding, your studies may decline. On the other hand, a happy social and family life can help you do better in school.


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You can discuss your day with your partner and have a shoulder to lean on when you are feeling overwhelmed. You will be able to focus better and may feel more motivated to get good grades. A supportive dating partner can encourage you when you need to be motivated. He may be willing to work together on projects or help you to study for exams.

Dating & Academic Performance

Be cautious about dating someone who is more concerned with hanging out. If your date has no patience for the time you must devote to studying, put an end to the relationship before it begins affecting your schoolwork. Moderate to high volumes of dating activities can negatively affect your performance in school. This study draws on interviews with currently dating teens and results indicate that the romantic partner's grades are significantly related to adolescent respondents' self-reported grades, even after their own orientation toward school and traditional family, peer, and demographic controls have been taken into account.

We hypothesize, following results on peer influence processes, that this concordance reveals a tendency to select similar partners, but may involve social influence processes as well. A longitudinal analysis in which partners' grades predict respondents' grades reported at the second interview controlling for wave one grades and the other covariates lends support to this view.

Highlights

Research conducted by Chilman and Meyer in the early sixties surveyed academic performance of undergraduate married students as compared to the single undergraduates. Researchers followed a sample through one semester of school.

One of the objectives of the study was to find if married undergraduates achieved higher success in college through future vocational plans. Researchers used a stratified random sampling of one hundred nine married men and women, forty-seven single men and fifty-five single women. Grades from the previous semester were obtained and compared to the grades from the current semester, measuring academic performance. Results indicated differences based on 1 educational values, goals, and attitudes 2 family background, current life situation 3 dating and courtship 4 perceived satisfaction.

Of the participants followed that semester, the married couples received higher G. Married couples were shown to have a goal minded approach to academics.

Adolescent academic achievement and romantic relationships

Archival data was studied by Vockell and Asher in the early seventies that related to high school seniors dating frequency and their scholastic aptitude, achievement, and school related activities. Future plans of the individuals positively affected their frequency of dating, with respect to certain occupational goals. The main theme involved in most of the literature from the past was frequency of dating. Researchers were able to find a positive correlation to the role of dating on academic achievement.

romantic relationship and the academic performance of the student in Senior High School in Congressi

Researchers studied the main hypothesis that the prevalence of a significant other negatively affects the academic performance of an undergraduate student. Our study intended to positively link these two factors.